Art Blocks
Sidewalk Cinema: Inside Out
Photo: Morris Malakoff
No Longer on View

Sidewalk Cinema is an installation of contemporary video works in partnership with Aurora Picture Show. The third installment, "Inside Out" includes vertical video works by artists Prince Varughese Thomas, Chris Doyle, Christoph Heyden, Kevin Cooley and Electric Donut (Kristin Lucas and Joe McKay). These artists expand our perceptions by translating those things in our life that are known into something new and unexpected.

*Red, White, & Blue, (2017, Kevin Cooley, 10 minutes)
The meaning of this aggressive and voluminous smoke column may be understood, or attributed in many ways  — as a political smokescreen that shifts between the colors of the American flag. Or, as an explosive fit of social unrest in a metaphorical battle between opposing points of view.

Pool, (2016, Chris Doyle, 4:13 minutes)
The meaning of this aggressive and voluminous smoke column may be understood, or attributed in many ways  — as a political smokescreen that shifts between the colors of the American flag. Or, as an explosive fit of social unrest in a metaphorical battle between opposing points of view.

*Glimmers of Hope, (2017, Christoph Heyden, 10 minutes)
What makes us believe that hard times will get better? This is an important question on an emotional level for the survival of our humanity. Involving nature which surrounds us and which is inside of us, the artist tries to trigger emotions through his organic colors in motion. It’s a way of bringing to surface the emotional dance of the soul-making visible the little glimmers of hope inside of us.

Tablet Tumbler Flat Roller, (2015, Electric Donut, 8:33 minutes)
A large-scale object outfitted with mobile computing tablets functions as a multiple-camera recording device. Participants navigate through their own spaces. Recordings are presented as a continuous six-channel rolling point of view video that jump cuts from one New York City-area living space to the next.

White Wash, (2014, Prince Varughese Thomas, 8 minutes)
A graphically represents 24 hours of CNN programming from January 17, 1991 at the start of the first Persian Gulf War.

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